6. How do you find articles in print journals?
All Respondents
 

 
 

n

% of 381

Browsing current periodicals issues

159

41.7

Browsing back Issues in Stacks

114

29.9

Browsing dept library issue

41

10.8

Personal subscription

109

28.6

Cited references

264

69.3

Citations in online database

270

70.9

Other

28

7.3

 


(Count)
The most  frequent method of finding articles among all respondents was the use of citations in online databases (71%) followed by cited references (69%) and browsing current periodical issues (42%). Smaller but similar percentages browse back issues and use personal subscriptions (30% and 29%, respectively). The least used method was browsing issues in departmental libraries (11%).
 

 

All Respondents by Academic Status
 
(n / %) Browsing current periodicals issues Browsing back Issues in Stacks Browsing dept library issue Personal subscription Cited references Citations in online database Other
Faculty 87 63 17 85 147 134 14
48.3 35 9.4 47.2 81.7 74.4 7.8
Graduate 33 27 10 8 68 74 8
31.4 25.7 9.5 7.6 64.8 70.5 7.6
Undergraduate 18 12 7 6 25 33 2
35.3 23.5 13.7 11.8 49 64.7 3.9
Staff 17 10 5 9 19 26 3
43.6 25.6 12.8 23.1 48.7 66.7 7.7
Other 4 2 2 1 5 3 1
66.7 33.3 33.3 16.7 83.3 50 16.7
Total 159 114 41 109 264 270 28
  41.7 29.9 10.8 28.6 69.3 70.9 7.3
 
 

A large percentage of faculty respondents indicated they found articles in print journals by using cited references (82%), followed closely by citations in online databases (74%). Similar numbers of faculty browse current periodical issues and used personal subscriptions (48% and 47%, respectively). A fair percentage browse back issues (35%) while much lower number of faculty used journal issues in departmental libraries (9%). The responses from other categories of users were somewhat different. The highest percentage of use for both graduate and undergraduate students as well as staff used citations in online databases with somewhat lesser numbers (particularly for staff and undergraduates) using cited references. Compared to faculty, the percentage of students and staff who used browsed current or back issues was somewhat lower while the percentage who used personal subscriptions was much lower.  

Faculty by Subject Division

 

(n / %)

Browsing current issues

Browsing back issues in stacks

Browsing issues in dept library

Personal subscription

Cited references

Citations in online database

Other

Business

9

6

1

15

14

16

1

47.4

31.6

5.3

78.9

73.7

84.2

5.3

Education

8

6

3

10

14

16

0

42.1

31.6

15.8

52.6

73.7

84.2

.0

Engineering

8

5

0

6

15

17

1

44.4

27.8

.0

33.3

83.3

94.4

5.6

Fine Arts

9

7

1

5

11

6

3

56.3

43.8

6.3

31.3

68.8

37.5

18.8

Health Sciences

6

5

2

11

15

14

1

37.5

31.3

12.5

68.8

93.8

87.5

6.3

Humanities

15

11

3

7

18

15

2

75.0

55.0

15.0

35.0

90.0

75.0

10.0

Sciences

14

8

5

7

26

19

3

45.2

25.8

16.1

22.6

83.9

61.3

9.7

Social Sciences

14

13

1

20

26

22

2

45.2

41.9

3.2

64.5

83.9

71.0

6.5

Library

4

2

1

3

7

7

1

50.0

25.0

12.5

37.5

87.5

87.5

12.5

Other

0

0

0

1

1

2

0

.0

.0

.0

50.0

50.0

100.0

.0

Total

87

63

17

85

147

134

14

48.3

35.0

9.4

47.2

81.7

74.4

7.8

 

A very high percentage of faculty (82%) used cited references to locate articles in print journals. The next most popular way to locate articles was through citations in online databases (74%). More faculty browsed for current issues than for back issues and nearly 50% of the faculty used personal subscriptions. These results were fairly consistent across the subject divisions with some exceptions. For example, a much higher percentage of faculty in Business and the Health Sciences accessed articles in personal subscriptions. Fine Arts faculty accessed articles through online databases at a much lower percentage than faculty in other subject divisions. A relatively higher percentage of Humanities faculty browsed current issues than in other disciplines while the percentages of faculty who browsed back issues was relatively low and consistent across the divisions.

 

 

Graduate Students by Subject Division
 

(n / %)

Browsing current issues

Browsing back issues in stacks

Browsing issues in dept library

Personal subscription Cited references

Citations in online database

Other

Business

4

2

1

1

5

5

3

80.0

40.0

20.0

20.0

100.0

100.0

60.0

Education

4

1

0

2

14

19

1

16.0

4.0

.0

8.0

56.0

76.0

4.0

Engineering

7

5

3

3

11

9

0

41.2

29.4

17.6

17.6

64.7

52.9

.0

Fine Arts

1

4

1

0

4

6

0

16.7

66.7

16.7

.0

66.7

100.0

.0

Health Sci.

1

1

0

0

2

2

0

50.0

50.0

.0

.0

100.0

100.0

.0

Humanities

3

5

0

0

7

8

0

30.0

50.0

.0

.0

70.0

80.0

.0

Sciences

5

4

2

1

11

9

1

38.5

30.8

15.4

7.7

84.6

69.2

7.7

Social Sci.

8

5

3

1

14

16

3

29.6

18.5

11.1

3.7

51.9

59.3

11.1

Total

33

27

10

8

68

74

8

31.4

25.7

9.5

7.6

64.8

70.5

7.6

 

The highest percentage of graduate students used citations in online databases to locate articles in print journals (71%) followed closely by the use of cited references (65%). Very few students used personal subscription or departmental libraries. The percentage that located articles through browsing current issues was similar to that of students who browse back issues. There was some variation across subdivisions. For example, a much higher percentage of Business graduate students browsed current issues, Engineering students were more likely to use personal subscriptions and less likely to use online databases, and graduate students in Business, Health Sciences, and the Sciences indicated a relatively high use of cited references.
 

 

Undergraduate Students by Subject Division
 
(n / %)

Browsing current issues

Browsing back issues in stacks

Browsing issues in dept library

Personal subscription Cited references

Citations in online database

Other

Business

4

3

1

2

3

8

0

36.4

27.3

9.1

18.2

27.3

72.7

.0

Education

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

.0

.0

.0

.0

50.0

50.0

.0

Engineering

0

0

1

1

1

0

0

.0

.0

33.3

33.3

33.3

.0

.0

Fine Arts

2

0

1

2

1

4

0

40.0

.0

20.0

40.0

20.0

80.0

.0

Health Sciences

1

0

0

0

0

1

1

33.3

.0

.0

.0

.0

33.3

33.3

Humanities

1

1

0

0

3

2

0

33.3

33.3

.0

.0

100.0

66.7

.0

Sciences

2

2

0

1

3

3

0

33.3

33.3

.0

16.7

50.0

50.0

.0

Social Sciences

8

6

4

0

13

13

1

47.1

35.3

23.5

.0

76.5

76.5

5.9

Other

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

.0

.0

.0

.0

.0

100.0

.0

Total

18

12

7

6

25

33

2

35.3

23.5

13.7

11.8

49.0

64.7

3.9

 


 

 

Higher numbers of undergraduate respondents indicated they accessed articles in print journals from citations in online databases (65%) followed by the use of cited references. Slightly higher percentages browsed current rather than back issues and even fewer used departmental libraries of personal subscriptions. There were some variations across the divisions, but the relatively low number of overall respondents makes it difficult to see trends.