20. If your department or program has an established distance education program, would you support cutting back other resources in your discipline to add electronic access for distance education students?
All Respondents
 

 

n

%

Yes 27 11.0
No 38 15.5
Undecided 40 16.3
Not Available 140 57.1
Total 245 100.0

Only 11% of all respondents supported cutting back other resources to add electronic access for distance education. Just over 15% did not support cutting resources, and 16% were undecided. The highest percentage – 57% -- of respondents indicated that there departments did not have a distance education program.

 

All Respondents by Academic Status
 
  Yes No Undecided Not Available Total
Faculty 17 27 22 101 167
  10.2 16.2 13.2 60.5 100.0
Staff 5 3 6 22 36
  13.9 8.3 16.7 61.1 100.0
GAs. 5 7 10 15 37
  13.5 18.9 27.0 40.5 100.0
Other 0 1 2 1 4
  .0 25.0 50.0 25.0 100.0
Total 27 38 40 139 244
  11.1 15.6 16.4 57.0 100.0


The response was similar across the user groups with somewhat less support for cutting resources from staff and more “undecided” responses from graduate assistants. Just over 60% of faculty and staff indicated the established programs for distance education were not available in their departments/units.

 

Faculty by Subject Division

  Yes No Undecided Not Available Total
Business 1 2 1 14 18
  5.6 11.1 5.6 77.8 100.0
Education 6 2 4 6 18
  33.3 11.1 22.2 33.3 100.0
Engineering 1 2 3 10 16
  6.3 12.5 18.8 62.5 100.0
Fine Arts 0 6 2 8 16
  .0 37.5 12.5 50.0 100.0
Health Sciences 4 2 6 4 16
  25.0 12.5 37.5 25.0 100.0
Humanities 0 4 2 14 20
  .0 20.0 10.0 70.0 100.0
Sciences 1 3 2 20 26
  3.8 11.5 7.7 76.9 100.0
Social Sciences 3 6 2 16 27
  11.1 22.2 7.4 59.3 100.0
Library 1 0 0 7 8
  12.5 .0 .0 87.5 100.0
Other 0 0 0 2 2
  .0 .0 .0 100.0 100.0
Total 17 27 22 101 167
  10.2 16.2 13.2 60.5 100.0

Faculty in Education and the Health Sciences were the strongest supporters of cutting resources to add electronic access for distance education, the least likely to indicate that a distance education program was unavailable, and had the highest percentages of “undecided” responses among the faculty.