1. Rate the importance of print and electronic access for journals/magazines.

All Respondents
 

n

%

1 (lowest)

12

3.1

2

19

5.0

3

74

19.4

4

70

18.4

5 (highest)

206

54.1

Total

381

100.0

Print Journals

Half of all respondents rated print journals of the highest importance (5) while 73% gave a rating of 4 or 5. Only 8% of all respondents gave the lowest ratings to print journals (1 or 2).



(Count)

 

n

%

1 (lowest)

11

2.9

2

23

6.0

3

45

11.8

4

48

12.6

5 (highest)

254

66.7

Total

381

100.0

Electronic Journals

A greater percentage of all respondents gave the highest rating of 5 to the importance of electronic journals than did for print, i.e. 67% to 50%. A similar percentage gave the lowest ratings to electronic journals, i.e. either a 1 or 2.



(Count)
 

Print Journals

Electronic Journals

n

%

n

%

1 (lowest)

12

3.1

11

2.9

2

19

5.0

23

6.0

3

74

19.4

45

11.8

4

70

18.4

48

12.6

5 (highest)

206

54.1

254

66.7


Print and Electronic Journals Combined


Count

Among all respondents, there was not a clear preference for electronic over print journals with around 91% giving a rating of 3 or higher to the importance of both formats.
 

 

All Respondents by Academic Status
 

(n / %)

1

2

3

4

5

Total

Faculty

6

10

33

32

99

180

3.3

5.6

18.3

17.8

55.0

100.0

Graduate

1

3

20

20

61

105

1.0

2.9

19.0

19.0

58.1

100.0

Undergraduate

1

4

13

8

25

51

2.0

7.8

25.5

15.7

49.0

100.0

Staff

4

1

8

9

17

39

10.3

2.6

20.5

23.1

43.6

100.0

Other

0

1

0

1

4

6

.0

16.7

.0

16.7

66.7

100.0

Total

12

19

74

70

206

381

 

3.1

5.0

19.4

18.4

54.1

100.0

1 = (lowest)        5 = (highest)

Print Journals

 

A majority of respondents in each category (i.e. faculty, staff, graduate and undergraduate students) gave the highest rating of 5 to the importance of both print and electronic journals.
 

 

(n / %)

1

2

3

4

5

Total

Faculty

6

15

25

26

108

180

3.3

8.3

13.9

14.4

60.0

100.0

Graduate

2

3

6

7

87

105

1.9

2.9

5.7

6.7

82.9

100.0

Undergraduate

2

3

8

4

34

51

3.9

5.9

15.7

7.8

66.7

100.0

Staff

0

2

4

10

23

39

.0

5.1

10.3

25.6

59.0

100.0

Other

1

0

2

1

2

6

16.7

.0

33.3

16.7

33.3

100.0

Total

11

23

45

48

254

381

2.9

6.0

11.8

12.6

66.7

100.0

1 = (lowest)        5 = (highest)

Electronic Journals

 

Slightly more faculty and significantly more students (both graduate and undergraduate) and staff gave the highest rating to electronic journals than to print journals. There were fewer middle ratings of 3 in all categories for electronic than for print, especially among graduate students, 90% of whom rated electronic journals as a 4 or 5.
 


 

Faculty by Subject Division: Print Journals
 

(n / %)

1

2

3

4

5

 Total

Business

1

0

5

5

8

19

5.3

.0

26.3

26.3

42.1

100.0

Education

1

0

4

0

14

19

5.3

.0

21.1

.0

73.7

100.0

Engineering

2

4

5

4

3

18

11.1

22.2

27.8

22.2

16.7

100.0

Fine Arts

1

0

1

5

9

16

6.3

.0

6.3

31.3

56.3

100.0

Health Sciences

0

0

4

4

8

16

.0

.0

25.0

25.0

50.0

100.0

Humanities

0

1

1

4

14

20

.0

5.0

5.0

20.0

70.0

100.0

Sciences

1

3

4

6

17

31

3.2

9.7

12.9

19.4

54.8

100.0

Social Sciences

0

1

6

3

21

31

.0

3.2

19.4

9.7

67.7

100.0

Library

0

0

2

1

5

8

.0

.0

25.0

12.5

62.5

100.0

Other

0

1

1

0

0

2

.0

50.0

50.0

.0

.0

100.0

Total

6

10

33

32

99

180

3.3

5.6

18.3

17.8

55.0

100.0

1 = (lowest)        5 = (highest)





 

Overall, there is still strong support for print journals across most of the subject divisions with 73 of the faculty respondents rating print journals as a 4 or 5. However, there were some clear differences in how some disciplines rated print journals. Only 39% of the Engineering faculty rated print journals as a 4 or 5 while 90% of Humanities faculty and 87% of Fine Arts faculty gave print journals the highest ratings.

 

Faculty by Subject Division -- Electronic Journals
 

(n / %)

1

2

3

4

5

Total

Business

0

1

1

4

13

19

.0

5.3

5.3

21.1

68.4

100.0

Education

0

1

1

3

14

19

.0

5.3

5.3

15.8

73.7

100.0

Engineering

0

0

0

2

16

18

.0

.0

.0

11.1

88.9

100.0

Fine Arts

3

1

6

3

3

16

18.8

6.3

37.5

18.8

18.8

100.0

Health Sciences

0

2

2

0

12

16

.0

12.5

12.5

.0

75.0

100.0

Humanities

2

4

4

3

7

20

10.0

20.0

20.0

15.0

35.0

100.0

Sciences

0

0

4

5

22

31

.0

.0

12.9

16.1

71.0

100.0

Social Sciences

1

6

3

6

15

31

3.2

19.4

9.7

19.4

48.4

100.0

Library

0

0

3

0

5

8

.0

.0

37.5

.0

62.5

100.0

Other

0

0

1

0

1

2

.0

.0

50.0

.0

50.0

100.0

Total

6

15

25

26

108

180

3.3

8.3

13.9

14.4

60.0

100.0

1 = (lowest)        5 = (highest)



 

Overall, there is strong support for electronic journals across most of the subject disciplines with 74% of the faculty respondents giving electronic journals the highest ratings (4 or 5). However, the differences among some disciplines were exactly opposite of the responses related to print journals. Only 38% of Fine Arts faculty and 50% of Humanities faculty gave the highest ratings to electronic journals. A surprising 25% of Fine Arts faculty and 30% of Humanities faculty gave electronic journals the lowest rating possible. On the other hand, 100% of Engineering faculty rated electronic journals as a 4 or 5. The other disciplines also gave relatively high ratings to electronic journals – especially Business, Education, and Sciences.
 

Graduate Students by Subject Division --  Print Journals
 

(n / %)

1

2

3

4

5

Total

Business

0

1

1

1

2

5

.0

20.0

20.0

20.0

40.0

100.0

Education

0

2

9

7

7

25

.0

8.0

36.0

28.0

28.0

100.0

Engineering

1

0

4

2

10

17

5.9

.0

23.5

11.8

58.8

100.0

Fine Arts

0

0

0

3

3

6

.0

.0

.0

50.0

50.0

100.0

Health Sciences

0

0

0

1

1

2

.0

.0

.0

50.0

50.0

100.0

Humanities

0

0

1

2

7

10

.0

.0

10.0

20.0

70.0

100.0

Sciences

0

0

1

1

11

13

.0

.0

7.7

7.7

84.6

100.0

Social Sciences

0

0

4

3

20

27

.0

.0

14.8

11.1

74.1

100.0

Total

1

3

20

20

61

105

1.0

2.9

19.0

19.0

58.1

100.0
 

1 = (lowest)        5 = (highest)


Just over 80% of graduate student respondents gave print journals a rating – in terms of importance – of 4 or over. In a breakdown by subject division, over 90% of the students in the Health Sciences and Sciences and 100% of the students in Fine Arts and Humanities did the same. A smaller percentage of students in Business and Education rated print journals as highly. There was more of a spread in Engineering and the Social Sciences. There appears to be a relatively strong support for print journals among the graduate students who responded to the survey.

 

Graduate Students by Subject Division --  Electronic Journals
 

(n / %)

1

2

3

4

5

Total

Business

0

0

0

1

4

5

.0

.0

.0

20.0

80.0

100.0

Education

0

0

0

1

24

25

.0

.0

.0

4.0

96.0

100.0

Engineering

0

1

1

1

14

17

.0

5.9

5.9

5.9

82.4

100.0

Fine Arts

0

0

0

0

6

6

.0

.0

.0

.0

100.0

100.0

Health Sciences

0

0

0

0

2

2

.0

.0

.0

.0

100.0

100.0

Humanities

0

1

1

3

5

10

.0

10.0

10.0

30.0

50.0

100.0

Sciences

0

1

1

0

11

13

.0

7.7

7.7

.0

84.6

100.0

Social Sciences

2

0

3

1

21

27

7.4

.0

11.1

3.7

77.8

100.0

Total

2

3

6

7

87

105

1.9

2.9

5.7

6.7

82.9

100.0

1 = (lowest)        5 = (highest)

Overall, nearly 90% of the graduate student respondents rated electronic journals as 4 or over in importance. The high ratings were fairly consistent across the disciplines.

 

Undergraduate Students by Subject Division  -- Print Journals
 

(n / %)

1

2

3

4

5

Total

Business

0

2

2

1

6

11

.0

18.2

18.2

9.1

54.5

100.0

Education

0

0

2

0

0

2

.0

.0

100.0

.0

.0

100.0

Engineering

0

0

2

0

1

3

.0

.0

66.7

.0

33.3

100.0

Fine Arts

1

1

0

1

2

5

20.0

20.0

.0

20.0

40.0

100.0

Health Sciences

0

0

2

0

1

3

.0

.0

66.7

.0

33.3

100.0

Humanities

0

0

0

1

2

3

.0

.0

.0

33.3

66.7

100.0

Sciences

0

0

1

2

3

6

.0

.0

16.7

33.3

50.0

100.0

Social Sciences

0

1

4

3

9

17

.0

5.9

23.5

17.6

52.9

100.0

Other

0

0

0

0

1

1

.0

.0

.0

.0

100.0

100.0

Total

1

4

13

8

25

51

2.0

7.8

25.5

15.7

49.0

100.0

1 = (lowest)        5 = (highest)

Overall, 65% of undergraduate student respondents gave high ratings to the importance of print journals, i.e. 4 or 5. It is hard to see any trends based on subject subject divisions because of the relatively low number of undergraduate respondents. However, there were a number of students across all subject divisions that gave lower ratings to print journals – except in Humanities.

 

Undergraduate Students by Subject Division --  Electronic Journals
 

(n / %)

1

2

3

4

5

Total

Business

0

1

1

2

7

11

.0

9.1

9.1

18.2

63.6

100.0

Education

0

0

0

0

2

2

.0

.0

.0

.0

100.0

100.0

Engineering

0

0

2

0

1

3

.0

.0

66.7

.0

33.3

100.0

Fine Arts

1

0

1

1

2

5

20.0

.0

20.0

20.0

40.0

100.0

Health Sciences

0

0

0

1

2

3

.0

.0

.0

33.3

66.7

100.0

Humanities

0

0

1

0

2

3

.0

.0

33.3

.0

66.7

100.0

Sciences

1

1

0

0

4

6

16.7

16.7

.0

.0

66.7

100.0

Social Sciences

0

1

3

0

13

17

.0

5.9

17.6

.0

76.5

100.0

Other

0

0

0

0

1

1

.0

.0

.0

.0

100.0

100.0

Total

2

3

8

4

34

51

3.9

5.9

15.7

7.8

66.7

100.0

1 = (lowest)        5 = (highest)

A slightly higher percentage of undergraduate student respondents gave a 4 or 5 rating to electronic journals – 74%. Again, there were a number of students across all subject divisions that gave lower ratings to electronic journals – except for those in Education and the Health Sciences. A higher percentage of undergraduate students gave the highest rating (5) to electronic journals than to print journals.